Apple’s patent claim will not block the W3C Widgets specification

Back in April, I wrote about how Apple tried to block the W3C Widgets specification with a patent claim.

After spending a lot of W3C members' money to figure out if Apple's claims were valid, the Patent Advisory Group has now come to a conclusion: The work on Widgets 1.0 will continue. Apple's patent claim does not appear to be relevant to the Widgets 1.0 specification:

The Patent Advisory Group concluded that the inventive step claimed by US Patent Nr. 5,764,992 lies in the fact that the software program can update itself absolutely independent of functions performed by any resource external to the current software program. As the Widgets 1.0: Updates Draft uses an update-manager throughout the Specification, such self-updating does not occur.

Read the full report here: Report of the Patent Advisory Group on the Widgets Updates Specification

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14 thoughts on “Apple’s patent claim will not block the W3C Widgets specification

  1. It does not make sense that Apple should be able to patent what is basically just an auto-update feature. Good to see that widget developers will not have to build their own auto-update schemas.

  2. Originally posted by danaleks:

    It does not make sense that Apple should be able to patent what is basically just an auto-update feature. Good to see that widget developers will not have to build their own auto-update schemas.

    Many things don't make much sense in the Patent World, but reality teaches us that just because it doesn't make any sense – it doesn't mean it can't happen still.See the whole Eola case as a prime example, and really, many other examples of unknown companies that appear "out of thin air" and use their "patents" on the most trivial things to make huge amount of money, because other companies use their so-called "intellectual properties".Disgusting and careless behaviour.

  3. As the Widgets 1.0: Updates Draft uses an update-manager throughout the Specification, such self-updating does not occur.

    And where is this update-manager in Opera 10.10? Just one more reason for its return. ;):idea: Would be nice to have ability to check for updates in widget manager.

  4. Originally posted by FataL:

    And where is this update-manager in Opera 10.10? Just one more reason for its return.

    Nonsense. If you actually read Opera's reasons for doing this, you wouldn't have written crap like this. Widgets will never be proper applications if they keep being tied to the browser UI.

  5. Originally posted by Purdi:

    Widgets will never be proper applications if they keep being tied to the browser UI.

    They just can be managed both ways since widgets depend on Opera browser presence anyway. Also most of current Opera widgets is so tiny that hardly anyone would install and use them separate from the browser.BTW, I installed and tried to use Twitter widget as separate application, but after couple days I started to use Twitter widget from panel. Believe or not Twitter widget starts from panel faster (not significantly, but I can feel it) than as separate application.(God! That bug with TEXTAREA killing me!)

  6. Originally posted by FataL:

    Also most of current Opera widgets is so tiny that hardly anyone would install and use them separate from the browser.

    Yeah, except that's what they are trying to change, so why do things that will just keep widgets that way? You obviously didn't read Opera's statements on why they are doing this.

  7. Purdi, seems you have failed to recognize my message. I'm not against ability to run widgets as real applications. I'm against removing widgets manager, because it provides a way to quickly try/install/run widgets.

  8. I never said that you were against it. I was saying that a widgets manager would go against what Opera is trying to do (make widgets full applications). It's a perception thing. If they are tied to a browser people will keep thinking that they are just toys.

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