A week of Opera: Week 37, 2010

Last week was another eventful week for Opera, so I'll do another quick summary of some of the things that happened. …

We announced that the desktop team is growing, having added as many as 9 experienced engineers in one go.

Opera Mini is getting some love in Russia with this hilarious ad by MTS, the biggest Russian mobile operator. We announced an agreement with MTS back in February.

The Fall 2010 edition of the Opera Insights newsletter was published last week. While it is primarily aimed at businesses, it sheds some light on parts of Opera's overall strategy if you are interested in that kind of thing. For example, it explains the importance of the new Opera CDK, as it lets you quickly and efficiently develop content and applications for TVs straight from a computer. It also talks about how different devices will usually not replace each other, but will rather complement each other. While you can do some basic gaming on your phone, doing so on a dedicated portable gaming device is a completely different experience!

The connected TV market is growing, and Opera is investing heavily in that. We announced that we've been working with Trident on their Set Top Box solution, and Choose Opera had a bit of coverage of the yearly IBC TV trade show from the week before.

For example, you can see a video of Opera running on an embedded device, playing a H.264 encoded(!) HTML5 video on Youtube. Another video shows Opera running on an STB (Set Top Box), where you can see both Opera Widgets with fancy animations, and the full browser (including Speed Dial).

Jennifer has more pictures of Opera at at the IBC.

On the mobile operator front, it looks like the US is starting to notice Opera's rapid growth. We also announced a new deal with Russian operator NTC.

Finally, if you are interested in open standards, check out Molly's summary of the W3C CSS Working Group's face to face meetings at the Opera HQ.

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11 thoughts on “A week of Opera: Week 37, 2010

  1. Originally posted by haavard:

    For example, you can see a video of Opera running on an embedded device, playing a H.264 encoded(!) HTML5 video on Youtube.

    In case you're wondering, the device manufacturer paid for the license for its devices.

  2. Originally posted by haavard:

    For example, you can see a video of Opera running on an embedded device, playing a H.264 encoded(!) HTML5 video on Youtube.

    On *UNIX, right?*Notices the GUI of the browser, also*

  3. I wouldn't know the details of this post, since only the first sentence showed up in the RSS feed. Still, it was an excellent first sentence, and I look forward to more sentences in coming weeks.

  4. H.264 sucks (because of patents). All developers should ignore it (use free codecs instead) until H.264 will be free of charges and patents. A bit unrealistic, I know, but when Google has introduced his free codec, free period for H.264 (for end users) has been extended.

  5. Originally posted by João Eiras:

    In case you're wondering, the device manufacturer paid for the license for its devices.

    Originally posted by Daniel Hendrycks:

    On *UNIX, right?

    Thanks, I wondering about that 🙂

  6. Well, most of Opera's Devices licenses are Linux-based, right? That's part of why Desktop Linux support is so important. Using a common and well-defined framework like GStreamer makes media integration even easier, I'd imagine.Haavard, are these transferred engineers being pulled from the shrinking NRE division? It would make sense if Opera kept some of those people.Thanks for putting up summaries like this one. Could there be a "Choose Opera" feature about some of the more amazing uses for the Devices SDK? (Those GPS platforms, sony picture-frame, new ebook browser etc)

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