A Week of Opera: Week 40, 2010

There were some significant developments last week, one of which bodes well for the future of Opera Mini. …

We announced the Opera Mobile Ad Exchange, which lets publishers (web site owners) and advertisers reach mobile browsers, particularly the dominant mobile browser, Opera Mini. This means that one can reach new groups of users, and the users will see better and more relevant ads the way they are used to: Embedded in the web page itself.

There's more Opera Mini news as well. On today's web a lot of companies require content control. So to address that, we announced a partnership with NetSweeper which enables us to offer content filtering to operators. This is not only to filter sexual content and similar things, but also to protect against phishing and malware. While I personally think filtering of "adult content" works all that well, these are things that some companies require, and Opera has to adapt to the needs of its customers.

And speaking of adapting to real-world needs, we announced Opera's participation in Adobe's misleadingly titled Open Screen Project. I have previously made my opinions on this organization clear, but regardless of my personal thoughts on Adobe's misleading claims about openness, Flash does exist out there, and it's something browsers will need to handle. As a pragmatic company, Opera Software seems to have done what was necessary to possibly bring Flash support to mobile products.

So while our press release is filled with superlatives about the Closed Flash Project, I think the message to take away from this is not so much that "Flash is open and awesome" (which it isn't), but rather that "Opera Software recognizes the needs of the real web, and will adapt to that".

And if you just can't get enough about Opera strategy talk, ZDNet Asia has a piece on Opera's strategy towards mobile operators. Do you really want just a couple of dominant players in the market? If Android and iOS became the only options for mobile phones, that would be a problem. Opera enables operators to avoid such problems by tipping some of the power balance in their favor. Thanks to Opera, the market will no longer be at the mercy of companies like Apple or Google.

As I start to wrap up this summary, I notice that I didn't write much about the desktop version. In fact, I didn't mention it at all. But while there hasn't been a lot of things going on in public, apart from two release candidates for Opera 10.63, maybe there's something going on behind the scenes… At least there's a new 10.70 snapshot available today featuring Web Sockets, so check it out.

Finally, Opera was mentioned on Slashdot because of its native BitTorrent client. Someone was asking why BitTorrent hasn't replaced normal downloads yet, and while there are good reasons for that, I do believe that BitTorrent has very important use cases where it really shines, such as downloading large files like Linux distribution ISOs.

That's all for last week. This is the week of Up North Web, so hang on for another three days, and interesting things may happen.

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7 thoughts on “A Week of Opera: Week 40, 2010

  1. Pls how,were can i get the latest adobe player or any player that fits my phone nokia 6680. symbian phone, that i can use to watch video from the net?Pls help me.

  2. Originally posted by Attahh:

    Pls how,were can i get the latest adobe player or any player that fits my phone nokia 6680.

    Wrong place to ask about that.

  3. Originally posted by netwolf:

    No offense, but I strongly disagree that any company has to adapt to content filtering in any way.

    Yeah, ideologies are great… until you have to face the REAL world. Welcome to DOING BUSINESS.

  4. Originally posted by prd3:

    Yeah, ideologies are great… until you have to face the REAL world. Welcome to DOING BUSINESS.

    If you sell your ideologiy for doing business, you never really had one.Real ideology and good, honest business don't have to be a contradiction.

  5. Originally posted by netwolf:

    If you sell your ideologiy for doing business, you never really had one.Real ideology and good, honest business don't have to be a contradiction.

    Spoken like a kid with no business sense whatsoever.

  6. Finally, Opera was mentioned on Slashdot because of its native BitTorrent client. Someone was asking why BitTorrent hasn't replaced normal downloads yet, and while there are good reasons for that, I do believe that BitTorrent has very important use cases where it really shines, such as downloading large files like Linux distribution ISOs.

    :up:

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