W3C HTML5 Test Suite description updated to avoid confusion

There has been a lot of confusion around the W3C HTML5 Test Suite the last couple of days. It was widely reported that because IE9 seemed to pass most of the tests (many of which are made by Microsoft), it was the most HTML5 compliant browser (which is of course not true).

The HTML5 Test Suite Conformance Results page has now been updated to clarify the situation:

The HTML5 Test Suite Results aims to help implementers write applications that support HTML5. In no way are these conformance tests to be construed as providing certification or branding of HTML5 implementations. The only claim that could be made is that a particular implementation is conformant to a particular version of the HTML5 Test Suite.

It is inappropriate to cite those results as other than work in progress and unstable.

In other words: The results of these tests do not reflect the general HTML5 compliance. They only show which browsers pass those specific tests available at that specific time.

The page also explains that the Test Suite is under development. At the moment, there is a relatively small number of tests, but this will grow over time.

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7 thoughts on “W3C HTML5 Test Suite description updated to avoid confusion

  1. Originally posted by ouzoWTF:

    Sad that the news pages will probably never correct their statements 😦

    Worse: here in Brazil the "Internet Explorer 9 the most HTML5 compliant browser" news are just starting to be posted in portuguese! :faint:

  2. In other words: The results of these tests do not reflect the general HTML5 compliance. They only show which browsers pass those specific tests available at that specific time.

    They don't even seem to do that, as a whole bunch of tests show "No result" in the table, but when you actually run the test in the relevant agent, they pass (or at least seem to). See, for example, one of many canvas tests. Maybe I just don't understand the test methodology, but if that's the case the pass/fail indicators should be made more obvious…

  3. Most of the tech news is sensationalist anyways, I'll have to see if any more reputable tech sites have balanced articles.

  4. Originally posted by SteveKong:

    At least heise news – a popular site in Germany – reports that these test are classified as unofficial and incomplete now.article

    heise was the only news page I found which said from the beginning, that the tests are not complete yet (article).

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