You sounded off, and your top 3 problems with Opera are…

About a month ago, I posted a request for people to list their top 3 problems with Opera. I received more than 250 responses, and I'd like to thank all of you for your comments. …

The Top 3

Overall, it seems that the top 3 problems people are having are (in no particular order):

  • Site compatibility (Google sites were mentioned particularly frequently)
  • Performance (such as slowdown with a lot of tabs, and slow scrolling on some pages)
  • Stability (freezes and crashes)

Site compatibility in particular was obvious. It is one of the things that's taking a lot of resources on our part, and even though Presto was designed from the ground up to be compatible and handle badly coded sites (including supporting non-standard extensions like Internet Explorer's document.all), browser sniffing in particular is proving to be a headache in addition to bugs, missing features and other things that cause compatibility issues.

What else?

If we dig a little bit deeper into the comments, Opera Link was mentioned a number of times. There were also various smaller/more limited user interface issues and requests.

Another fairly common theme was things related to Opera Mail.

Several people also wanted more powerful extensions (the new extension APIs in 12.10 should please them).

Memory usage was also mentioned a few times, but this could be considered to be a performance related issue.

Maintenance of existing features seemed like a relatively common theme, and a handful of smaller features from other browsers were mentioned as well.

Conclusion

If I am to summarize all of this, there are a few common themes that can be placed into one of the top 3 categories of issues. Beyond that, people have somewhat differing priorities. And while some have fairly general remarks about areas they would like to see improved, others have rather specific and detailed requests.

Now, can we come to an overall conclusion based on this?

I think the main conclusion from my point of view is that the overall themes of the feedback are things we are already aware of, and actively working on. One might say that the feedback confirms many of the things we already know.

That is not to say that it was not a useful round of feedback. Feedback which supports existing conclusions is also useful because it shows that the current view of the situation is correct.

TL;DR, and now what?

The TL;DR is that site compatibility, stability and performance (in no particular order) were the main themes, and the overall impression is that the feedback confirms what we already know.

What happens next is that we're going to keep working on improvements across the board. We do have some specific plans to improve things even further, but the details on that will have to wait for a future blog post. Keep an eye on the desktop team blog for the latest developments.

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29 thoughts on “You sounded off, and your top 3 problems with Opera are…

  1. :cheers: for your Hard Work.I definitely want extension API to be more (alot more) powerfull. (For example accessing browser preferences).Plus i am looking forward for Opera interface improvement.As far as Performance is concerned, i think main issue is memory consumption, But i would love to see Opera once again Speed King (As it as during 10 version).:flirt:

  2. Handling automatic proxy servers simply doesn't work.I thought it was something wrong in my past company but it current one it is even worse.It's disgusting, but I have to use Chrome :/

  3. Are you going to do anything about the fact that the whole UI is essentially designed for Mac OS X and that Windows and Linux are basically secondary priorities when it comes to that matter? Also, the UI layout itself hasn't changed significantly since version 8, which was released around 7 years ago and so, it probably should be about time to see some progress there. That, however, is looking unlikely as it seems that your UI designers spend nearly all of their working hours obsessively tweaking the icons so that they better fit OS X.

  4. There were also various smaller/more limited user interface issues and requests.

    Are you allowed to tell me, if the redesign of preferences is anywhere on the roadmap in next 2-3 years?

  5. Also, why do you guys not share any technology roadmaps with us? For some inexplicable reason you maintain a level of secrecy that is borderline absurd.

  6. Thanks for doing this and I'm glad to hear that Opera is already looking into improving these issues. I think one of the frustrating things as a user is that there isn't always a lot of feedback from the developers when there are complaints. So it's nice to have some reassurance that our complaints aren't falling on deaf ears.I think it's important for Opera users to be patient with some of these issues too. I'm sure these aren't easy problems to fix, and won't be knocked out in an afternoon. We can expect incremental improvements, but it will take time. And we have to understand that just because other features are being worked on and released doesn't mean that these important issues aren't being worked on in the background.

  7. I hope "feedback confirms what we already know" does not mean I don't get better, readable UI I already had long time ago in the future 😛

  8. One of biggest problems by far is the fact, that bug reports are not public, which makes bug reporting – and even more so – bug handling much more difficult as there is no way to know if issue is already reported or not.The recommendation to check the forums etc. before issuing the report means simply that anybody has to post the issue also on the forum for others to know, which pretty much doubles the amount of work and kinda' makes bug reports "public" anyway. I do not talk about opening source code, but current situation with bugs and reporting is just one horrible mess, where nobody really knows, what is reported and what is not – even not to mention what is been worked on and which will not be fixed. It is kind of hard to remember, how long it took to get network performance of Linux builds anywhere. There was noticeable leap forward in this, but issue is still not fixed.Being Opera user for over 10 years it's starting to be more and more difficult to stay with Opera. Without any "transparency" the development starts to look more and more "Microsoft'ish" to outsiders..

  9. I developed an extension called Fix the Web to address site compatibility issues: https://addons.opera.com/en/extensions/details/fix-the-web/It is far from where I'd like it to be. I haven't been able to work on it for quite a while. However, I should be able to resume the development process soon. I have a small, yet enthusiastic, group of Opera users who I am working with. Our goal is to temporarily patch site problems, but ultimately to encourage site owners to fix the actual problem on the site. We have succeeded with about half a dozen Turkish websites: http://my.opera.com/fix-the-web/blog/2012/05/17/web-site-list-that-have-been-fixed-over-two-moths We hope to make much more progress in this area.

  10. What is Opera's stance on the performance issue: jumping to an anchor (typically the first unread post in a forum topic) waiting for each element to load?Where typically an avatar image from a slow server can delay the jump to the first unread post (we don't know where that post is) for more than 5s or sometimes even more than 10s. It delays the stream of productivity; it makes being on a potent 100 Mb/s fiber optic connection a laughable experience.Please make the loading of all elements asynchronous to jumping to an anchor. In the forum scenario you want to start reading as text is most important; images come in second place.This problem has been reported for years and years by various regulars and was never picked up. Please dear QA and developer people…

  11. I just wanted to point out that the word "stability" sometime might be ambiguous.Probably what users are trying to tell want they talk about crashes and stability, is that something should work, but it's not working, talking about crashing might mean that it's not working in the worst way.Please think about it, not because it stays open is better if it does not do what it has to do.:up:

  12. Wow, about 10% mentioned printing in the comments. I wouldn't have thought that it is important enough to so many users to put it into the top 3 …BTW: I would not count stability issues in the statistics. A software that is not stable is not usable at first and all other problems become secondary. It should be obligatory for any company to release a product that works within normal parameters as long as the user doesn't tinker around and makes it unstable …

  13. Havaard: I didn't add mail issues, because you specifically asked for browser not mail client issues. My three main M2 issues would be:1. it is not possible to forward mails as files2. cannot opt to place signature above forwarded or replied message (I know RFC… but it is somewhat standard where I am and having to copy/paste the signature is not quite handy)3. PGP or some of that sort is missing.

  14. I cannot understand those who want "new UI", "clean UI", whatever; I don't think Opera should be wasting time on reinventing the wheel.I see 2 main problems with Opera – and only about one of them Opera can do something about.First problem is disastrous development of the Web itself, which is aimed to make users more and more out of control of their browsing. It is done to control the user (knowing exactly where and when he or she went) and to serve ads in more unavoidable way. We can call it making Internet for "content providers" (not for users).Second thing is the abandonment of developing new features and failure to preserve the old ones. I must say I cannot remember any useful new feature developed lately. Tab stacking was abandoned before it got useful. Memory Back is no more. There is no development in the field of restricting abusive javascript and other abusive new Web technologies. Even something as simple as Firefox latest feature to load tabs on accessing them is not being implemented? I understand you are trying to gain popularity, but making Opera look like Chrome won't do it. Because it is not the qualities of Chrome that make it popular – it is huge effort by Google to advertise it and to make it most compatible with Google services.

  15. This will really help improve Opera. I love using Opera and it would be great if there will be more improvement

  16. I think the UI needs a redesign, and there are some small features that Firfox has that would be great.The placement of their stop/reload button is actually a shorter distance from where my mouse cursor ends up most times. The form saving feature is great. It learns by site domain and file type where I am most likely to want to save a file, if you turn off downloading to the download directory and have it always ask you.It highlights tabs on Google+, Gmail, and Twitter when you have new messages. The session restore saves the text from forms and closed tabs and windows. And it allows you to pick which tabs to restore.Load on demand tabs saves memory. Also in the speed dial it should not scroll, it should just give us tabs to organize them. Also it would be nice to be able to right click a speed dial and open it in the background.

  17. Originally posted by M-Z:

    but making Opera look like Chrome won't do it.

    Chrome's UI is what I dislike the most about it. :left:

  18. Originally posted by toyotabedzrock:

    I think the UI needs a redesign

    You are already using a redesigned user interface. Asking for change or redesign for the sake of change is not very useful. This is not the right place to post requests either.

  19. Originally posted by haavard:

    You are already using a redesigned user interface.

    If this is the best that your UI designers can do, then that is very unfortunate for all the parties involved.Originally posted by M-Z:

    I cannot understand those who want "new UI", "clean UI", whatever; I don't think Opera should be wasting time on reinventing the wheel. …

    Really? You can't understand the concept of wanting a more intuitive and aesthetically pleasing user interface? Also, does designing a new exterior for a car also constitute as "reinventing the wheel" in your book? And lastly, I hope that you do realize that their UI designers aren't going to be doing much development in "the field of restricting abusive javascript", because that is quite simply not their area of expertise.Edit: Removed the insult/truism about the capabilities of the UI designers.

  20. Interface is better than in any other browser (I would like a "Save page" on right click menu, though 😀 – even if my own defined mouse gesture does the job just fine (and although this is not a request area, a more visual/intuitive (re)definition (reassignment) for mouse gestures is the only thing I feel missing))

  21. Originally posted by apriorimeister:

    Really? You can't understand the concept of wanting a more intuitive and aesthetically pleasing user interface?

    No I don't. At least not when it breaks everything old down and not when it is making program less useful. Simple example – I use Opera probably 10 hours a day (of course with breaks, but I use it at work and at home). Do you think that from the point of view of a person like me (heavy user) changing colours in Mail program was useful (to make it look cool, new, fancy, fashionable, whatever)? My eyes "bleed" from this (well, they would if I hadn't changed it; but I needed to modify DLL with hex editor to achieve this!). What about people with eyesight disablilities? Or just with floaters? Is making text colour grey on white background really improves readability?And there is also something called user's habit.

    Also, does designing a new exterior for a car also constitute as "reinventing the wheel" in your book?

    Yes, it does. Call me fanatically rational, but I wouldn't buy a car whose only advantage is new look (of course analogy is flawed because programs don't break down just because they are old, cars do).

    And lastly, I hope that you do realize that their UI designers aren't going to be doing much development in "the field of restricting abusive javascript", because that is quite simply not their area of expertise.

    1. New features need new UI (preferably comfortable one).2. I am not against changing (or preferably refining) UI to make it more useful. But burying everything so deep that you have to make 10 clicks to get there is not the way to do it. And neither is disabling features.3. If you change UI, some other things can break too – it takes time of testers and other developers which could be otherwise used to develop useful things. Why do it without sensible reason?4. All this is somewhat beside the point. Chrome is getting popular not because it's dreadful UI, but because it has Google behind itself.4'. If they made Opera look and behave like Chrome, what reason would be then to use it?

  22. Originally posted by M-Z:

    No I don't. At least not when it breaks everything old down and not when it is making program less useful. Simple example – I use Opera probably 10 hours a day (of course with breaks, but I use it at work and at home). Do you think that from the point of view of a person like me (heavy user) changing colours in Mail program was useful (to make it look cool, new, fancy, fashionable, whatever)? My eyes "bleed" from this (well, they would if I hadn't changed it; but I needed to modify DLL with hex editor to achieve this!). What about people with eyesight disablilities? Or just with floaters? Is making text colour grey on white background really improves readability?And there is also something called user's habit

    I never proclaimed that I wanted the UI changed in a way that would make the browser less useful, in fact, I stated just the opposite by saying that I would like the UI to be more intuitive. Also, I don't particularly care for user habit, I reckon that if you make something better they would grow to enjoy the change. PS My eyes happen to house an unfortunate amount of floaters.Originally posted by M-Z:

    Yes, it does. Call me fanatically rational, but I wouldn't buy a car whose only advantage is new look (of course analogy is flawed because programs don't break down just because they are old, cars do).

    "Fanatically rational" is something of a misnomer. I never stated that I would buy a car whose only advantage is a "new" look either. Also, your analogy explaining how my analogy is flawed is flawed, as the breaking down of a physical object had nothing to do with it. Originally posted by M-Z:

    1. New features need new UI (preferably comfortable one).2. I am not against changing (or preferably refining) UI to make it more useful. But burying everything so deep that you have to make 10 clicks to get there is not the way to do it. And neither is disabling features.3. If you change UI, some other things can break too – it takes time of testers and other developers which could be otherwise used to develop useful things. Why do it without sensible reason?4. All this is somewhat beside the point. Chrome is getting popular not because it's dreadful UI, but because it has Google behind itself.4'. If they made Opera look and behave like Chrome, what reason would be then to use it?

    1. Not all of them. 2. I'm starting to see a pattern here, you keep arguing with things that I never said. 3. Progress/improvement be it aesthetic or functional is a sensible enough reason, at least in my book. 4. Once again the pattern repeats, nowhere have I stated that Chrome is getting popular because of its UI – Actually, I haven't even mentioned Chrome in any of my earlier posts. 5. I don't know, but I haven't suggested that they should make Opera look and behave exactly like Chrome either, so I probably don't need to answer that question.

  23. UI of Opera is one of the things that "makes me smile"(even though it's not perfect). it's really clean, simple yet feature-full. Chrome looks like an application for children comparing to Opera (and well… it is in my opinion). Firefox is also far from perfect(smallest reload/stop button ever, and no alternative to do this actions other way?…). For all those who want "comfortable ui" (whatever it means for you) – have You actually tried customizing buttons, bars and using gestures? get to know Your browser, CHANGE HABITS learned from other applications, and then complain.About top 3: "Site compatibility" in Opera seems like a big myth to me… there is stuff that won't work, but to put it on such top 3? Again- there are ways to deal with theoretically not working sites… masking is solving most of problems, and if it's not, some extensions are there to help. It kind of reminds me of a "problem", back when Opera didn't support extensions and people complained about no "ad-block" for it… such a non-sense… Opera has built-in blocking system that is working very well… but for some reason there are dozens of extensions to do it too… and another zillion of exact copies of other opera built-in functions. Those extensions should be marked somehow, so people would know this feature is already in Opera and there is no need to install extra stuff – This is small issue, but in my opinion it deserves to be in "top 3" way more than "Site compatibility". Other two points are however somehow right. Performance is not as good as it's used to be few years ago; js performance and more complex sites especially. Stability is also getting worse comparing to Opera years ago.Anyway it's good to know Opera is listening to users and responding to it. This browser is for us to use after all!

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